Most times when I have taken over new roles or added more portfolios to my current workstreams, it has usually involved decision making to either build on or completely overhaul legacy code. I’ve truly encountered some horrific code bases that are no longer understandable, secure or  scaleable. Often if there is no ownership of the code or if attrition has rendered it an orphan, it usually sits unnoticed ( like an argiope spider waiting for its prey) until it breaks (usually on a friday afternoon) when someone has to take ownership of it and bid their weekend plans goodbye. Rarely do teams have  a singular coding style with patterns and practices clearly defined that are repeatable and can withstand change people or technology change – if you are in such an utopian situation, consider yourself truly lucky!

A lot of times,  while you have to understand and reengineer the existing codebase, it is imperative to keep the lights on while you are figuring out the right approach, a sorta situation while you got to keep the car moving while changing its tires. I discovered Tenacity while  encountering a bunch of  gobbledygook shell and python scripts crunched together that ran a critical data pipeline and had to figure out a quick retry logic to keep the job running  while it randomly failed due to environment issues ( exceptions, network timeouts, missing files, low memory and every other entropy-inducing situation on the platform). The library can handle different scenarios based on your usecase.

  • Continuous retrying for your commands. This usually works if its a trivial call where you have minimal concerns over overwhelming target systems. Here, the function can be retried until no exception is returned.
  • Stop after a certain number of tries. Example – if you have a shell script like shellex below that needs to execute and you anticipate delays or issues with the target URL or if a command you run raises an exception, you can have Tenacity retry based on your requirement .
  • Exponential backoff patterns – To handle cases where the delays maybe too long or too short for a fixed wait time, tenacity has a wait_exponential algo that can ensure that if a request cant succeed in a short time after a retry, the application can wait longer and longer with each retry thus alleviating the target system of repetitive fixed time retries.

The library handles plenty of others uses cases like Error handling, custom callbacks and tons more.

Overall, this has been a great find to use a functional library like Tenacity to for various usecases instead of writing custom retry logic or implementing a new orchestration engine for handling retries.

By ingvay7